Should You Refinance Your Home?

As mortgage rates hit a historical low, you may be wondering whether or not you should begin the process of refinancing your mortgage. At Frank B. Pallotta Law Firm, we are here to walk you through your options and guide you in the best way we can. 

Benefits of Refinancing

There are multiple advantages to refinancing your mortgage loan. If mortgage rates are exceptionally low to the point that it would lower your monthly mortgage payment, this would be a great opportunity for you to move forward with the refinancing process. 

Another great reason to refinance your mortgage is to shorten your loan term from a 30 year loan to a 15 year mortgage loan. This could seriously accelerate your goals to having your home completely paid off. 

If you have an adjustable rate mortgage (ARM), refinancing your mortgage could give you more predictable payments with a fixed-rate loan to lock in your rate for the remainder of the loan. 

You Should Refinance If…

If you’re facing a cash flow issue then a cash-out refinance issue may be the best plan for you. You can read more about this option in our latest blog post. Since mortgage loans usually have lower interest rates and are tax deductible, this might be a good option for you.

If you have reached 20% equity in your home then it is time to refinance to eliminate the lender-paid mortgage insurance (PMI) premium that is built into your loan.

Lastly, if you need to remove a person from your mortgage usually due to a divorce or to remove a co-signer no longer needed, the only way to accomplish this is by refinancing. 

What To Expect When Refinancing

Before you begin the refinancing process, there are a few things you’ll want to check first. Make sure you have at least 20% equity in your home. If you will still have to pay PMI even after you refinance for a lower interest rate, you will want to crunch the numbers to see if refinancing even makes sense for you. 

You’ll also want to check to make sure your credit score is at least 760 and your debt-to-income ratio is 36% or less. This will give you the best chances to get the lowest interest rate. 

Last but not least, be sure to calculate the break-even point and how refinancing will affect your taxes.

Ready to Call Your Real Estate Attorney?

If you think refinancing is the best next step for you or if you have more questions about what your options are, we are here to help you. Give us a call today and let our expert team guide you. With videoconferencing still in effect under COVID-19 Executive Orders, Frank B. Pallotta Law can make your refinance closing even easier.

What You Should Know About Home EQUITY

We can set all the right plans for our future but no one could predict things like a global pandemic, an economic recession or a natural disaster. When those things hit, it’s important to know what options you have to get your hands on some cash if you need it.

If you need a cash-out refinance or a home equity line of credit, there are some important things to know about the process and how that will impact you long term. 

What is a Cash-Out Refinance?

When you have a cash-out refinance, you are borrowing against your home equity to obtain funds. With this type of refinancing, you receive your check at closing and the amount of this loan is then added onto the mortgage that you owe. Since mortgage rates tend to be lower than other types of debt and are tax-deductible, this route can be a very cost-efficient way to borrow.

Doing this results in a new mortgage loan which may have different terms than your original loan. These terms could range from a different type of loan, a different interest rate or a longer or shorter time period for paying off your loan.

Before your check is cut, proceeds are first used to pay off your existing mortgage and any closing costs or prepaid items. You can expect similar closing costs to your original mortgage at your cash-out refinance closing.

What is a Home Equity Line of Credit?

Home equity line of credit (HELOC) is taken out in addition to your existing mortgage. Since this is considered a 2nd mortgage, it will have its own term and repayment schedule separate from your 1st mortgage. However, if your house is already paid for and fully owned by you (no mortgage), some lenders allow you to open a home equity line of credit and the HELOC will be your 1st and only mortgage.

With a HELOC, you can withdraw from your available line of credit as needed during your draw period, which is usually about 10 years. During this period, you’ll make monthly payments with principal and interest. After the draw period ends, the repayment period begins with 20 years to repay the outstanding balance.

HELOC usually has no (or relatively small) closing costs.

Ready to Call Your Real Estate Attorney?

If you’re in need of taking any equity out on your home, the best next step is to call Frank B. Pallotta Law today. Our expert team will guide you through your current situation and make you feel confident in choosing the right decision between a cash-out refinance or a home equity line of credit. And with videoconferencing still in effect under COVID-19 Executive Orders, Frank B. Pallotta Law can make your refinance closing process entirely stress free.